We are thrilled to share that we now offer Veterinary Acupuncture for your pets!
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Country Veterinary Hospital offers an array of both prescription and over the counter products to keep your pet happy and healthy. Our in-house pharmacy is stocked with prescription medications to provide preventive care, treat illnesses and ensure that your pet's medication is always available.

Other products available include:

  • Flea, Tick & Heartworm Preventatives
  • Prescription Diet Pet Foods
  • Vitamins & Supplements

We see emergencies during our normal hospital hours. Please call us at 301-829-0414 for immediate assistance. If your pet has an after-hours emergency or if we determine that your pet requires overnight nursing care or a level of specialty we cannot provide here, we will co-ordinate your pet’s referral to the appropriate critical care or specialty hospital.

We refer after-hours emergencies to:

CARE Frederick Emergency Services
1080 W. Patrick Street (Rte. 40), Frederick, MD 21703
(P) 301-662-2273

Central Carroll Animal Emergency
1030 Baltimore Blvd., #180 Westminster, MD 21157
(P) 410-871-2000

Ellicott City Animal Emergency
10270 Baltimore National Pike, Ellicott City, MD 21042
(P) 410-750-1177

Emergency Veterinary Clinic
32 Mellor Avenue Catonsville, MD 21228
(P) 410-788-7040

 
 

clientcare@countryveterinaryhosp.com

clientcare@countryveterinaryhosp.com

Annual veterinary care is crucial to keeping your pet happy and healthy. Click the icons below to learn more about what your veterinarian can do for your pet.

  Pet Exams icon   Pet Vaccines icon  
 

Exams check overall health and detect problems before they become severe or costly.

 

Vaccines protect against common and fatal diseases based on your pet's age and lifestyle.

 
Pet Dental & Oral Care icon   Veterinary Lab Tests icon   Parasite Prevention icon
Dental and oral care prevents bad breath and diseases that could become life-threatening.   Lab tests diagnose and prevent sickness or injury in safe and non-invasive ways.   Parasite prevention treats and protects against deadly heartworms, parasites, and flea/tick infestations.
         
  Pet Nutrition icon   Spaying & Neutering icon  
  Nutrition ensures your pet gets the balanced diet it needs and maintains a healthy weight.   Spaying and neutering protects pets from serious health and behavioral problems.  
 

Care Guides for Pet Owners

Your pet's health also depends on you. Click on the icons below to learn more about what pet owners can do at home to keep their pets living a long, healthy life.

Pet Home Care icon   Care for Pets at All Ages icon   Pet Ages & Stages icon

Home care is just as important as veterinary care in keeping your pet happy and healthy.

 

Care for all ages includes veterinary care and home care tips for your pet at every age.

 

Ages and stages is our chart to help you find out your pet's age in "human years."

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Bringing your pets to the veterinarian for a physical exam every year is the smartest and easiest way to keep them healthy. Exams allow your veterinarian to detect any problems before they become severe or costly.

Pet Exams for Dogs and CatsYour Veterinarian Will Check...

  • muscular and skeletal health by feeling for healthy muscle mass and joint pain.

  • neurologic system – it could indicate birth defects in younger pets, and cognitive issues in older pets.

  • appropriate weight and  lifestyle for your pet's age.

  • lymph nodes – swollen nodes can indicate a wound, virus, infection or some other illness.

  • vital signs (temperature, pulse and respiration) – an abnormal reading could indicate illness.

  • skin and coat condition for growths, infection wounds and overall skin health.
     
 

Bring Your Pet to the Veterinarian Every Year for a Clean Bill of Health and Peace of Mind

Your pet can't tell us what's wrong. But routine physical exams can help your veterinarian detect any problems or diseases you might not have otherwise picked up on, including heart murmurs, tumors, enlarged organs, cataracts, ear infections, ear mites, dental and gum disease, skin issues and allergies.
 
     


Download the Pet Exams handout

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Vaccines protect against common diseases that your pets may become exposed to.

Did You Know?

Vaccines have about a 95% success rate for preventing infections and fatal diseases.

     
  Canine Vaccines

Rabies

The rabies vaccine is required by law and protects against the fatal illness. Rabies can be transmitted to other pets and people through the bite of an infected animal.

Distemper (DHPP)

This combination vaccine protects against viruses that cause life-threatening neurologic, respiratory and gastrointestinal issues.

Leptospirosis

This vaccine protects against a bacteria that can cause deadly kidney or liver disease. Leptospirosis is also transmissible to people.

Lyme

This vaccine helps prevent Lyme disease, which is easily transmitted through the bite of an infected tick.

 
 

Lifestyle Vaccines

These might be recommended if your dog visits boarding facilities, groomers, training classes, dog parks, and other social settings.

Bordetella

This vaccine protects against an airborne respiratory virus known as "Kennel Cough."

Canine Influenza

The canine influenza vaccine protects against a contagious respiratory infection.

 
 
     
  Feline Vaccines

Rabies

The rabies vaccine is required by law and protects against the fatal illness. Rabies can be transmitted to other pets and people through the bite of an infected animal.

Distemper (FVRCP)

This combination vaccine protects against viruses that cause life-threatening respiratory and gastrointestinal issues.
 
     
 

Lifestyle Vaccine

This is given to all outdoor cats, including those who go out occasionally -even if it's just on an open porch.

Feline Leukemia

This vaccine protects against the contagious and often fatal disease, which is easily spread between cats.

 

 

     
 

Vaccines are the key to a long and healthy life. Your veterinarian will suggest the best vaccines for your pet based on age, medical history and lifestyle.

 
     

Download the Pet Vaccines handout

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Oral disease is the most frequently diagnosed health problem for pets. Without proper preventive or home care, plaque and tartar can build up, which may cause oral infections, bad breath, infected gum tissues (gingivitis) or even bone loss (periodontitis).

Did You Know?

It's not normal for your pet to have bad breath – it can be a sign of serious dental or gum issues.

Pet Dental & Oral Care

     
 

Sixty percent of dental disease is hidden below the gum line, and can only be found with x-rays. Brush your pet's teeth regularly and check with your veterinarian about screenings, cleanings and products available to help keep those pearly whites clean.

 
     


Download the Pet Dental & Oral Care handout

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Yearly lab tests are safe and non-invasive ways to diagnose and prevent sickness or injuries in pets that a physical exam cannot detect.

     
  Dog and Cat icon

Blood Screening

A blood screening checks for anemia, parasites, infections, organ function and sugar levels. It is important to get a blood test annually for your pet, to help your veterinarian establish a benchmark for normal values and easily see any changes that may point to problems.

Urinalysis

This test has the ability to screen for diabetes, urinary tract infections, bladder/kidney stones, as well as dehydration and early kidney disease.

Intestinal Parasite Check

Using a stool sample, your veterinarian can check to see if your pet has parasites. Many parasites can be passed on to humans, so it is important to complete this screening annually, especially if your pet has any symptoms including upset stomach, loss of appetite and weight loss.

 
     
 
 
     
 

Routine testing can add years to your pet's life. Your veterinarian will recommend lab tests appropriate for your pet based on age and lifestyle.

 
     
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  Dog Icon

Canine Tests

Your veterinarian may check for the presence of heartworms in your dog, as well as the three common tick-borne diseases – Lyme, Anaplasma, and Ehrlichia Canis.
 
     
 
 
     
  Cat icon

Feline Tests

A combination test checks for heartworm, Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV). FeLV and FIV are serious diseases that weaken the immune system, making cats susceptible to a variety of infections and other diseases. FeLV is spread through casual contact, and FIV is transmitted primarily through bite wounds. They can also be transferred to cats by their mothers. Any new pets, or sick/stray cats entering a household, should be tested.

Blood Pressure Testing

Senior cats are routinely tested for high blood pressure. It may occur as a secondary disease to another illness and is commonly seen in older cats. But it can affect a cat at any age and cause damage to the eyes, heart, brain and kidneys. A new heart murmur or alterations in your cat's eyes during a routine exam may prompt your veterinarian to take a blood pressure reading.

 
     

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Prevention is the best approach in protecting your pet against deadly heartworms, intestinal parasites, and flea and tick infestations. Your veterinarian will help you find the product that is right for your pet based on his or her needs.

     
 

EXTERNAL PARASITES
are assessed visually by your veterinarian.

 
     
  Flea icon

Fleas

Fleas thrive when the weather is warm and humid. All cats and dogs are susceptible to flea infestations. Beyond the skin irritation and discomfort, flea infestations can also cause deadly infections, flea-allergy dermatitis (OUCH!) and the transmission of tapeworm parasites if ingested.

Tick icon

Ticks

Ticks can spread serious infectious diseases such as Lyme, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis and Babesiosis to pets and people. Pet owners should inspect their pets regularly for ticks, large and small, especially after being outside in a wooded or grassy area.

 
     
 
     
 

INTERNAL PARASITES
are assessed by blood tests and fecal exams.

 
     
 
  Intestinal Parasite icon

Intestinal Parasites

Roundworm, hookworm, tapeworm, whipworm, Coccidia, Giardia and Cryptosporidium are all common in cats and dogs. Many of these parasites can be transmitted to you and your family if your pet becomes infected.

Heartworm icon

Heartworm

Mosquitoes can spread heartworm, a harmful disease that affects both dogs and cats. As its name implies, heartworm lives in the blood of a pet's heart and blood vessels. We recommend annual screenings for both dogs and cats, even if they are already on heartworm preventatives.

 
     
     
     
 

Life is better for your pet and family without parasites.
Let us help you choose your flea, tick, heartworm and
intestinal parasite preventatives today!

 
     


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Just like humans, an animal's diet directly affects its overall health and well-being. Allowing a pet to overeat, or to consume the wrong foods, may lead to a wide variety of ailments including obesity, diabetes and arthritis.

Did You Know?

Over 50% of dogs and cats in the United States are obese or overweight.

Proper Nutrition

Although we think of our pets as family members, they shouldn’t be allowed to eat like us. Maintaining a proper diet will help keep your pet at a healthy weight. Be sure not to overfeed, and that you are providing a diet tailored to your pet's breed, age, weight and medical history.

Common Foods To Avoid

Think twice about feeding your pet table scraps. Common foods such as chocolate, grapes, raisins, onions and garlic could be dangerous to an animal. Some non-food items like lily plants and antifreeze are also toxic to pets. Check with your veterinarian if your pet has ingested anything questionable.
Pet Nutrition

 

Growth Diet

Growing puppies and kittens need more nutrient-dense food than adults. Ask your veterinarian which food is right for this stage of life. Cats switch to an adult diet right after being spayed or neutered, no matter what the age, to decrease the likelihood of obesity and related conditions.

Adult Diet

Selecting an adult dog or cat food that will keep your pet healthy and energetic starts with knowing your pet's lifestyle. Does your dog weigh just the right amount and go for long walks daily? Or is it a lap dog that loves nothing more than to snooze the day away? Talk to your veterinarian about these issues to help guide you in choosing the best food for your pet.

Senior Diet

Your senior dog or cat may need fewer calories, less fat, and more fiber as he or she ages. Many older pets can continue eating the food they always have – just a little less to compensate for not being as active. Check with your veterinarian which food and amount is best for your pet.

   
     
 

Every pet ages differently. Your veterinarian can help you determine the best diet for your pet's needs.

 
     


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Spaying or neutering can protect your pet from serious health and behavioral problems later in life. It also helps control the stray animal population.

Spaying or Neutering Reduces the Risk of...

Uterine Disease

Known as a pyometra, this is a potentially life-threatening condition which can be very expensive to treat. It is 100% preventable if your pet is spayed.

Mammary Tumors (Breast Cancer)

Over one-half of all mammary tumors are malignant and can spread to other areas of the body. Early spaying, prior to your pet beginning its heat cycles, significantly reduces the incidence of tumor formation.

Testicular Cancer

This cancer, as well as prostatitis (an infection causing malignant or benign swelling of the prostate), can be greatly reduced with early neutering.

 

Behavioral Problems

Unwanted behaviors such as dominance aggression, marking territory and wandering can be avoided with spaying or neutering.

Overpopulation

There are more puppies and kittens in shelters than there are people willing to provide them with love and care. Sadly, many are euthanized. Spaying or neutering can help reduce the number of animals in need of homes.Cat and Dog graphic

   
     
 

Spayed and neutered pets live healthier and longer lives! Consider the benefits to your pet and the community, and ask us when is the best time to spay or neuter your pet.

 
     


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Make your pet's well-being a priority. See your veterinarian regularly and follow these tips to keep your pet happy and healthy.

Nutrition

Your veterinarian will give you a recommendation for a high quality and nutritious diet for your pet, and advise you on how much and how often to feed him or her. Diets may vary by species, breed and age.

Identification

Microchipping is a safe and permanent identification option to ensure your pet's return should he or she get lost. Ask us about the process and get your pet protected.

Safety

Always keep your dog on a leash in public, and your cat indoors to protect them from common hazards such as cars and other animals.

Grooming

Frequent brushing keeps your pet's coat clean and reduces the occurrence of shedding, matting and hairballs. Depending on the breed, your pet may also need professional groomings.

Dental and Oral Health

Brush your pet's teeth regularly and check with your veterinarian about professional cleanings as well as dental treats and products available to help prevent bad breath, gingivitis, periodontitis and underlying disease. Although your pet's teeth may look healthy, significant disease could be hidden below the gum line.

 

Exercise

Be sure to spend at least 15 minutes a day playing with your cat to keep him or her active and at a healthy weight. All dogs need routine exercise to stay fit, but the requirements vary by breed and age. Ask us what's best for your dog. Doggy daycares and boarding facilities are other ways to help to burn off some energy and socialize your pets.

Training

Enroll your dog in training classes to improve his or her behavior with pets and people. Cats need minimal training. Be sure to provide them with a litter box beginning at four weeks of age.

Environmental Enrichment

Entertain your pet's natural instincts by using toys that encourage them to jump and run. Cats especially need to fulfill their instinct to hunt – provide interactive toys that mimic prey like a laser pointer or feathers on a wand. You can also hide treats in your pet's toys or around the house to decrease boredom while you're away.Pet Care at Home

     
 

Be Your Pet's Guardian Angel

Call us if your pet experiences vomiting, diarrhea, poor appetite, lethargy, trouble breathing, excessive drinking or urinating, wheezing or coughing, pale gums, discharge from nose, swollen eye or discharge, limping, and/or difficulty passing urine or stool as these may be signs of illness.

 
     


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Every animal is unique, and the start of each stage of life calls for different home and veterinary care. Check with your veterinarian to establish a proactive wellness plan to keep your pet happy and healthy throughout its life.

Annual Wellness

Puppies and kittens must receive a series of properly staged vaccines and physical exams. During these exams, your veterinarian may also recommend parasite preventatives or lab tests.

Adult pets will need to continue visiting the veterinarian annually for physical exams, recommended vaccines and routine testing.

Senior pets can develop similar problems seen in older people, including heart disease, kidney disease, diabetes and arthritis. Your veterinarian may recommend biannual visits to ensure your pet's quality of life.

Spay/Neuter

Females spayed before their first heat cycle will be less likely to get uterine infections, ovarian cancer and breast cancer. Males neutered at any age will be less likely to get prostate disease. Spaying or neutering also helps prevent behavioral problems like marking and escaping. Talk to your veterinarian about spaying or neutering your pet.

Nutrition

Pets require different types of food to support each life stage. Growing puppies and kittens need more nutrient-dense food than adults while adult dogs and cats need food that will keep them healthy and energetic. Your senior dog or cat may need fewer calories, less fat, and more fiber as he or she ages. Talk to your veterinarian to determine what's appropriate for your pet.

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Exercise

Adult dogs should stay active with daily walks and one-on-one training. Keep your adult cats fit by using toys that encourage them to run and jump, and be sure to give them at least 15 minutes of playtime a day.

Weight management of your senior dog or cat is extremely important to ensure they are at an ideal body weight and able to move around comfortably.

Training

Behavioral issues are a major cause of pet abandonment. Begin training your puppy or kitten right away to prevent bad habits and establish good ones.

Start house training your puppy as soon as you get home. Keep your puppy supplied with plenty of chew toys so he or she gets used to gnawing on those and not your belongings.

All cats need a litter box, which should be in a quiet, accessible room. Place your kitten in the box after a meal or whenever it appears he or she needs to go. Be sure to scoop out solids daily and empty it out completely once a week. The number of boxes in your household should be the total of number of cats plus one.

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Animals age at a faster rate than humans do, and your pet's health needs will evolve over time. Use this chart to figure out your pet's age in human years, and check with your veterinarian to establish a wellness plan specific to your young, adult or senior pet.

Pet Ages & Stages Chart

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All our veterinarians are skilled general practitioners, which means they have a wide range of experience in many areas of medicine and surgery. They can serve as your pet's pediatrician, family practitioner, dentist, radiologist, general surgeon and gerontologist! Of course, should your pet require services beyond what we offer, we can refer you to one of the many area board-certified specialists in every field imaginable. All this means that you and your pet can have access to the best possible care that veterinary medicine has to offer.

Tom Armitage, DVMDr. Tom Armitage, Co-Chief of Staff, is a graduate of the Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine. A native of Ohio, he also attended Miami University of Ohio and Ohio State for his undergraduate education. Dr. Armitage moved to the area upon graduation in 1980 and started his career as an associate in the practice. He finds the problems presented to him every day in veterinary medicine fascinating and challenging, and has a particular interest in surgery.

Dr. Armitage is a member of the Western Maryland Veterinary Association (MVMA) and through 2011-2012 was served as president. He and his wife, Dr. Jan Rubenstein, have two children and several pets. In his spare time, he enjoys biking, hiking, and the occasional golf round.

Allen Holden, DVMDr. Allen Holden, Co-Chief of Staff, is a Cleveland, Ohio native. He attended the Ohio State University for both undergraduate and veterinary education. After practicing equine medicine in Indiana for a year, he moved to Maryland and joined Country Veterinary Hospital in 1982. Dr. Holden enjoys all aspects of veterinary medicine, especially helping new pet owners with the challenges of introducing a new puppy, kitten, or rescued adult dog or cat into their household.

In his spare time, Dr. Holden enjoys fly-fishing, picking the banjo, and listening to bluegrass music. He and his wife also enjoy hiking, kayaking, and spending time with their grandchildren. They share their home with Brody and Elle, their two Golden Retriever-Labrador crosses.

Dr. Blair Snively, DVM with DogSince she was four years old, Dr. Blair Snively knew she wanted to be a veterinarian. She received a BS degree in agricultural science and technology at the University of Maryland College Park, a BA degree in biology at Hartwick College, and a DVM degree from Mississippi State University.

Dr. Snively is especially interested in dentistry, ophthalmology, dermatology, and acupuncture. But her favorite part of veterinary medicine is meeting new people and animals, and developing a bond with families and their pets. She has eight pets of her own — four horses (Blaze, Jackson, Cash, and Cricket), three dogs (Roo, Blossom, and Timber), and a cat (Ninja).

Dr. Michael King is a 1990 graduate of the University of Maryland with a BS in Accounting. He then attended Purdue University's School for Veterinary Medicine, obtaining a DVM degree in 1997. Originally from Maryland, Dr. King returned to the area and has been a small animal practitioner in Frederick. He comes to us with extensive experience in small animal medicine and surgery.

Dr. King lives on a farm in New Market with his wife and two children, and they are active in their church and 4H. He has four cats and a 6-year-old Australian Shepherd and says he also has "a thousand dogs and cats for pets that I take care of every day." He is a huge Maryland Terrapins sports fan, especially football — Go Terps!

Country Veterinary Hospital on Facebook

17591 Frederick Road
Mt Airy, MD 21771
P: (301) 829-0414
F: (301) 829-1509

We are thrilled to share that we now offer Veterinary Acupuncture for your pets!

dog-acupunctureDr. Snively flew down recently to the Chi Institute in Florida and passed her Acupuncture Certification exam, even getting 100% on her lab practical! She is now a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist.

Acupuncture is a safe procedure that can help treat pets with inflammation, immune system dysfunction, neurologic disease, and hormone imbalance. Learn more here.

We look forward to being able to provide even more amazing services for your pets. Please join us in congratulating Dr. Snively on this great achievement!

Our founder and former owner, Dr. Richard Hough recounts the story of how it all began

Celebrating 50 years"When the first hospital was opened July 1960, it occupied a rehabbed woodshed. Water was brought to this facility in a one gallon jug. Office hours were held in the evening after farm calls were completed. The patients seen were approximately one third pet dogs and cats, one third farm dogs, and one third hunting dogs. The community here in Western Howard County was rural. Mount Airy was very small and had only one stoplight.

The first veterinary hospital was located on the farm where I grew up and worked. My home was a new trailer located behind the woodshed. My wife was a school teacher and my mother was our receptionist the first year. Our telephone number was 549W. The telephone system was staffed by telephone company operators who occasionally took our calls when my mother wasn't available. My wife retired from school teaching the second year and became our receptionist, lab technician, assistant surgeon and bookkeeper.

Dog and Cat on BedOur Canine & Feline Early Detection Packages are specially designed to give your dog and cat the best care possible for their stage of life. While annual heartworm and parasite testing are the standard of care nationwide, veterinarians are increasingly recognizing the importance of regular urine and blood testing, as "healthy" dogs and cats often hide the clinical signs of disease. Our packages allow us to identify and treat problems before they become serious.

Adult Dog Package

Evaluates major organ functions, checks for hidden infections, screens for the presence of heartworm, tick borne diseases, and common intestinal parasites, as well as precursors for chronic diseases.

Our team of caring professionals is devoted to you and your pet!

Hospital Manager Jane at Front DeskJane came to the Country Veterinary Hospital with over 10 years of managerial experience. She has two pets — Teddy (Pomeranian) and Toby (Pom/Chihuahua mix). Outside of work Jane enjoys fishing, crabbing, walking and spending time with family and friends.

 

 

Veterinary Technician Candice with DogCandice joined the Country Veterinary Hospital team in the winter of 2016 with two years past veterinary technician experience. When she is not at work, Candice loves spending time with Keira – her black lab mix and going to the gym.

 

 

Veterinary Technician AshleyAshley joined our team with four years of veterinary technician experience in the winter of 2016. She enjoys crafting and spending time at the park with her daughter. Ashley enjoys snuggle time with her Labrador retriever mix Domino and her cat Panther.

 

 

Veterinary Technician Emily with Dog Emily joined the CVH team in June of 2017. She has a zoo at home – four furry creatures, fifteen scaled reptiles and ten things with gills. Emily enjoys hiking, running, reading and anything animal related. She absolutely loves working with animals, and hopes to go to vet school and become an exotic veterinarian.

 

Veterinary Technician Chelsea with DogChelsea joined the CVH team in the winter of 2017. She came to us with two years prior vet tech experience. Chelsea enjoys barrel races and rodeos. She has three horses, two dogs, three cats, and several ducks at home and has a true love of all animals.

 

 

Veterinary Technician HannahHannah joined Country Veterinary Hospital in the summer of 2016 with three years of veterinary technician experience. Hannah enjoys going to the beach, running and playing with her golden retriever, Riley.

 

 

Veterinary Technician Becky with DogBecky started working at Country Veterinary Hospital in 2015 during an internship with us. She has now graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Biology and anticipates starting vet school in the fall of 2017. Becky loves horseback riding and playing with her dog Brooks and cat Cam.



Client Care Specialist JoanneJoanne started working at Country Veterinary Hospital part time in 1995 and is still going strong. She has two pets, Jill (Min Pinscher) and Taffee (Chihuahua). Joanne enjoys cooking, walking with her neighbors and spending time with her five grandchildren.

 

 

Client Care Specialist GuntaGunta joined the Country Veterinary team in 2010. She has three pets — Fred (Shepherd Mix), Boone (Leonberger) and Isabel (Calico cat). Gunta also volunteers and fosters for a cat rescue. When not at work, Gunta enjoys yoga, reading and getting together with friends and family.

 

Client Care Specialist KaylaKayla joined our team in the summer of 2017. She has a lot of ER receptionist experience from her previous jobs. Kayla has two dogs, Rocky, a Chihuahua mix, and Apolla, a Min Pin. In her spare time, Kayla enjoys shopping, eating, going to amusement parks, and spending time with her pets.